Random header image... Refresh for more!

Seattle City Council approves urban farm/garden legislation

SUBJECT: Seattle City Council approves urban farm and community garden legislation improving access to locally grown food

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
8/16/2010 2:45:00 PM

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Laura Lockard (206) 684-8159

Council President Richard Conlin

Seattle City Council approves urban farm and community garden legislation improving access to locally grown food

SEATTLE � As part of the 2010 Year of Urban Agriculture, the Seattle City Council approved Council Bill 116907 that supports the rapidly growing local food movement. The ordinance updates the City�s Land Use code governing urban agriculture uses, including allowing “urban farms” and “community gardens” in all zones, with some limitations in industrial zones. Also, residents will now be able to sell food grown on their property.

“These code changes will strengthen our community food security,” said Council President Richard Conlin, sponsor of the ordinance. “This is one more action that supports the goals of the Local Food Action Initiative: increases opportunities for Seattle residents to purchase and grow healthy food in the city.”

“This is an exciting time to be an urban farmer,” said Nicole Jain Capizzi, owner of Amaranth Urban Farm in Rainier Beach. “I recently moved to Seattle to start an urban farm and am encouraged by the City�s on-going actions that strengthen Seattle’s food system.”

This legislation formally recognizes Farmer’s markets allowing them in more areas of Seattle. The ordinance also allows dedicated food production on rooftop greenhouses with a 15 foot exemption to height limits in a variety of higher density zones.

“The code changes related to rooftop greenhouses are a bold step toward high-yield food production in an urban environment,” stated Branden Born, Associate Professor of Urban Design and Planning at University of Washington. “The Seattle City Council is again on the forefront of initiatives that show a true commitment to improving access to healthy food.”

The legislation improves the number of chickens allowed per lot from three to eight, with additional chickens allowed for large lots associated with community gardens and urban farms. The legislation prohibits new roosters and sets boundaries for chicken coops, ten feet away from primary residential structures. Existing chicken coops built prior to the code changes will remain legal.

More information on raising chickens in the city can be found at:
http://www.seattle.gov/council/urbanagriculture/chickens_in_city.htm

via Seattle City Council News Release: Seattle City Council approves urban farm and community garden legislation improving access to locally grown food.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • RSS
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon

1 comment

1 lupus lefou { 08.17.10 at 8:33 pm }

Thanks for the seattle related post, brother. I do appreciate the insight some of the local city council demonstrates with actions such as this.

Leave a Comment